Cocaine Hospitalisations up by 90 %

Cocaine Hospitalisations up by 90 %

According to analysis from news outlet VICE, the number of people being hospitalised for behavioural and mental disorders has nearly doubled over the past few years. Not to mention A&E incidents where cocaine has been mentioned, which has been reported at more than 100 percent over the past few years.

The fact that cocaine is dangerous and can ruin lives has been a well-known and researched phenomenon. Cocaine is the second most abused drug in the United Kingdom, second to cannabis only. Surprisingly enough however, the rate of cocaine use does not correlate in accordance with the cocaine related incidents at A&E. Before the spike in cocaine related hospitalisations, the percentage of adults between the ages of 16 and 59 who regularly used cocaine, was just under 2%. The rate currently lies at 2.5%.  There has been an increase of users with a rate of 25%, but an increase of hospitalisations by nearly 100% – there must be a rational explanation for this.

One theory that could explain away the discrepancy in the rates, could be the increased strength of the cocaine. Four years ago, parliament introduced new regulations that made the possession of popular cutting agents – such as benzocaine- illegal.  This made benzocaine a hard to come by product, which increased the value of these cutting agents. At some point, it became cheaper for drug dealers to sell pure cocaine, rather than cocaine cut up with benzocaine. Purer cocaine therefore causes a lot more damage to the brain and body.

Another issue with a criminalised drug like cocaine, the fact that the drug is illegal deters people from taking it in the first place. On the flipside however, research has pointed out that many people who abuse the drug, will not search help due to the illegal status of the drug they take, and therefore the risk of overdosing and/or hospitalization increases severely. To make matters worse, many believe the NHS is currently understaffed and under-equipped to deal with cocaine related A&E visits. Many behavioural hospitalisations are often psychosis related, which makes it challenging to control.

Do you fear that your cocaine abuse could lead to a hospitalisation or even worse, death? It is not too late to stop. about our Cocaine  Contact Ocean Recovery Centre today, and we can help you by scheduling a first meeting regarding cocaine rehab over the phone as soon as possible. Alternatively, use our contact form for more information